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2 Seater Mobility Scooters Mobility Scooters

There are two categories of mobility scooter, into which many different types of models fall.

Class 2 mobility scooters can’t be used on the road (except where there isn’t a pavement) and have a maximum speed of 4 mph. Alternatively, Class 3 mobility scooters can be used on the road, and have a maximum speed of 4 mph off the road, and 8 mph on the road.

Interestingly, a report commissioned by the Department for Transport found that many suppliers of mobility scooters fail to inform their customers of the legal requirement to register these larger Class 3 scooters with the DVLA. To register a Class 3 mobility scooter, complete form V55/4 for new vehicles, or V55/5 for used vehicles.

You must also take into consideration that tandem mobility scooters are no different from a conventional driver-only model, other than their stretched chassis and additional seat. However, they are not currently legal to use on British roads or pavements.

According to the Department for Transport:

Tandem mobility scooters cannot legally be used on pavements or roads in Britain. In law, a mobility scooter and a powered wheelchair are both considered to be an ‘invalid carriage’, defined under the Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act 1970. The specific definition is: Section 20 (2) “invalid carriage” means a vehicle, whether mechanically propelled or not, constructed or adapted for use for the carriage of one person, being a person suffering from some physical defect or disability.

What’s more, the Department for Transport does not have any plans to amend the legislation to make Tandem mobility scooters lawful.

So, although you will find many suppliers and shops that readily market and sell 2-person mobility scooters, you must be aware that if you do choose to purchase one, you will not be complying with UK law regarding the ‘Chronically Sick And Disabled Persons Act 1970’.

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